A Force to be reckoned with
       
     
 Dirt from 21 locations, 2010-2016  23in x 19in x 25in
       
     
04_In order to rise from its own ashes, a Phoenix first must burn_2013_Record album covers, resin, Styrofoam.jpg
       
     
murrell_jasmine_05.jpg
       
     
Calling all Moon children everywhere
       
     
       
     
Unspecified targets
       
     
966972_387756021342003_149282474_o.jpg
       
     
blackhole.jpg
       
     
       
     
murrell08.jpg
       
     
Captured by boxes
       
     
Captured by boxes
       
     
feet.jpg
       
     
Hood series
       
     
Hood series
       
     
       
     
Hood Series
       
     
A Force to be reckoned with
       
     
A Force to be reckoned with

Dirt from 21 locations, 2010-2016

23in x 19in x 25in

 Dirt from 21 locations, 2010-2016  23in x 19in x 25in
       
     

Dirt from 21 locations, 2010-2016

23in x 19in x 25in

04_In order to rise from its own ashes, a Phoenix first must burn_2013_Record album covers, resin, Styrofoam.jpg
       
     
murrell_jasmine_05.jpg
       
     
Calling all Moon children everywhere
       
     
Calling all Moon children everywhere

2010

avocado, wire

       
     
Unspecified targets
       
     
Unspecified targets
966972_387756021342003_149282474_o.jpg
       
     
blackhole.jpg
       
     
       
     
murrell08.jpg
       
     
Captured by boxes
       
     
Captured by boxes

paper, string

2012

Captured by boxes
       
     
Captured by boxes

paper, string

2012

feet.jpg
       
     
Hood series
       
     
Hood series

Hood Series 2009

Contemporary urban identity has been both shaped and branded by the word, “hood”. The sculptures presented from The Hood Series derived from my fascination with the root of this word and sparked an investigation into its meaning. From characters like Red Riding Hood to Franciscan monks, they all share the physical characteristic of the hood – the hood used to guard and protect ones’ virtue. The modern language use of “hood” brings to mind the urban setting of the neighbor-hood; or to name the criminal underbelly: hood-lums; their actions: hood-wink; or a piece of everyday urban apparel: hoody.

The Hood Series sculptures evoke the imagery of people cloaked in hoods, which endeavor to equally conceal their identity and protect their humanity. The sculptures embody both figurative forms and urban dwellings that demonstrate coexisting characteristics of decay and renewal. These thick wood pieces are carved, painted and weathered on the outside suggesting the survival of objects against the test of time and erosion. Their outer shells possess a heavy, rustic texture that provokes the presence of both the organic and manmade materials. Hood sculptures open up like a hardened shell, beholding a vulnerable interior of organic forms shaped from pig intestines.
Upon closer inspection there are no ‘faces’ under these hoods, instead the sculptures open up to expose an interior of sharp, abrasive wire and organic forms constructed from pig intestine (chitterlings). The cultural connection of pig intestine represents an ability to transform refuse into substance and to survive and thrive from the scraps. With this series, I take seemingly simple words and basic foods that are both culturally loaded with meaning and transform them into unlimited possibilities.

 

Hood series
       
     
Hood series

Hood Series 2009

Contemporary urban identity has been both shaped and branded by the word, “hood”. The sculptures presented from The Hood Series derived from my fascination with the root of this word and sparked an investigation into its meaning. From characters like Red Riding Hood to Franciscan monks, they all share the physical characteristic of the hood – the hood used to guard and protect ones’ virtue. The modern language use of “hood” brings to mind the urban setting of the neighbor-hood; or to name the criminal underbelly: hood-lums; their actions: hood-wink; or a piece of everyday urban apparel: hoody.

The Hood Series sculptures evoke the imagery of people cloaked in hoods, which endeavor to equally conceal their identity and protect their humanity. The sculptures embody both figurative forms and urban dwellings that demonstrate coexisting characteristics of decay and renewal. These thick wood pieces are carved, painted and weathered on the outside suggesting the survival of objects against the test of time and erosion. Their outer shells possess a heavy, rustic texture that provokes the presence of both the organic and manmade materials. Hood sculptures open up like a hardened shell, beholding a vulnerable interior of organic forms shaped from pig intestines.
Upon closer inspection there are no ‘faces’ under these hoods, instead the sculptures open up to expose an interior of sharp, abrasive wire and organic forms constructed from pig intestine (chitterlings). The cultural connection of pig intestine represents an ability to transform refuse into substance and to survive and thrive from the scraps. With this series, I take seemingly simple words and basic foods that are both culturally loaded with meaning and transform them into unlimited possibilities.

 

       
     
Hood Series
       
     
Hood Series

Hood Series 2009

Contemporary urban identity has been both shaped and branded by the word, “hood”. The sculptures presented from The Hood Series derived from my fascination with the root of this word and sparked an investigation into its meaning. From characters like Red Riding Hood to Franciscan monks, they all share the physical characteristic of the hood – the hood used to guard and protect ones’ virtue. The modern language use of “hood” brings to mind the urban setting of the neighbor-hood; or to name the criminal underbelly: hood-lums; their actions: hood-wink; or a piece of everyday urban apparel: hoody.

The Hood Series sculptures evoke the imagery of people cloaked in hoods, which endeavor to equally conceal their identity and protect their humanity. The sculptures embody both figurative forms and urban dwellings that demonstrate coexisting characteristics of decay and renewal. These thick wood pieces are carved, painted and weathered on the outside suggesting the survival of objects against the test of time and erosion. Their outer shells possess a heavy, rustic texture that provokes the presence of both the organic and manmade materials. Hood sculptures open up like a hardened shell, beholding a vulnerable interior of organic forms shaped from pig intestines.
Upon closer inspection there are no ‘faces’ under these hoods, instead the sculptures open up to expose an interior of sharp, abrasive wire and organic forms constructed from pig intestine (chitterlings). The cultural connection of pig intestine represents an ability to transform refuse into substance and to survive and thrive from the scraps. With this series, I take seemingly simple words and basic foods that are both culturally loaded with meaning and transform them into unlimited possibilities.